August 17, 2017

ACLU Sues Miami for Complying with Trump’s Immigration Detainer Policies

AP File Photo/Alan Diaz

AP File Photo/Alan Diaz

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is suing Miami-Dade County, Florida, and its mayor for complying with President Donald Trump’s policies on immigration detainers.

A Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Inspector General (OIG) report under then-Attorney General Loretta Lynch identified Miami-Dade County as not honoring immigration detainers, Breitbart Texas reported. Following President Trump’s executive order withholding federal law enforcement grants from jurisdictions not in compliance with immigration officials, Miami-Dade County reversed its sanctuary city policy and began honoring immigration detainers.

The ACLU urges, perhaps warns, “other cities large and small across the country” to “refus[e] to serve as tools of overzealous immigration enforcement policy.” The group is seeking money damages because their client spent an extra night in jail “solely for a suspected civil immigration violation.”

The ACLU of Florida issued a statement from Amien Kacou that called the county’s decision “to cave in to the Trump administration’s anti-immigrant threats” “premature.”

After they filed the lawsuit, the self-described “nation’s premier defender of the rights enshrined in the U.S. Constitution” tweeted, “We warned the county about the dangers posed by the premature decision.”

“The practice of treating everyone with an immigration detainer as not eligible for release has immediate and dire effects,” they pleaded in the federal complaint.

The suit filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida, Miami Division, states:

The County voluntarily detained Mr. Creedle at the request of federal immigration authorities of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). The detention occurred pursuant to a directive from Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez that requires the Miami-Dade Corrections and Rehabilitation Department (MDCR) to deny release for 48 hours or more to any person who is the subject of a check-the-box immigration detainer request.

ACLU’s Kacou said in the formal statement, “Miami-Dade County has long prided itself on being a place welcoming to immigrants, and should honor that legacy by joining other cities large and small across the country in refusing to serve as tools of overzealous immigration enforcement policy.”

The ACLU filed the lawsuit on behalf of the plaintiff, Garland Creedle, who was born in Honduras but is an American citizen because his father was an American citizen when he was born. Creedle has been living in Honduras but came to the United States in 2015. Officials with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) put him in administrative removal proceedings, but they filed a motion in April 2015 to terminate the matter because Creedle had submitted documentation showing that he was a U.S. citizen.

The group filed the federal complaint asking for money damages because the plaintiff, Garland Creedle, was illegally detained in the county jail for an extra day. Police arrested him on the evening of March 12 after an alleged domestic violence incident. Creedle’s lawyers say their client was entitled to be released by posting bond but was held “based on the assertion that he is a ‘removable alien’.” No charges were filed, and he was released on March 14. They filed a request for a jury trial.

The federal lawsuit names Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez as a plaintiff. The plaintiff asserts that the mayor’s immigration detainer policy released January 26 violates the United States Constitution; in particular, the Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause and the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against unlawful seizures. They pleaded that the defendants “commit[ed] the common law tort of false imprisonment.”

Creedle’s lawyers urge that the City’s policy also violates Florida law that forbids jails from detaining people for “civil” immigration reasons. The county commissioners passed a resolution in December 2013 “which directed the Mayor to limit the County’s authority to hold individuals under immigration detainer requests.” They argue the policy imposed two conditions before the county would comply with a federal immigration detainer: (1) the federal government had to agree to “reimburse the County for all associated costs in writing;” and (2) after that condition was met, “the County would detain only individuals who have been charged or convicted of certain enumerated offenses.”

Amien Kacou and Nancy Abudu of the ACLU of Florida, the Immigration Clinic of the University of Miami School of Law, and the lawyers with the firm of Kurzban Kurzban Weinger Tetzeli & Pratt, P.A., are representing the 18-year-old Creedle. They argue that Mayor Gimenez’ immigration detainer directive “reversed over three years of prior policy, under which Miami-Dade Co. declined to use millions of taxpayer dollars to underwrite the federal government’s immigration enforcement agenda.”

The ACLU asks the federal court to issue a declaratory judgment declaring Miami-Dade County’s policy on immigration detainers invalid. The group also wants Creedle’s detention ruled unconstitutional and asked for compensatory damages, reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs and any other relief the judge deems just and proper. They urge that Creedle has “suffered injuries, including financial, pain and suffering, humiliation, and emotional harm,” because he was detained in the jail for an extra day.

They urge that a “detainer is not supported by a warrant or any other probable cause determination” but is only a “fill-in-the-blank form” (a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Request for Voluntary Transfer).

Bob Price serves as associate editor and senior political news contributor for Breitbart Texas. He is a founding member of the Breitbart Texas team. Follow him on Twitter @BobPriceBBTX and Facebook.

This article was originally published on Breitbart.com.

A Lawless Presidency – Part 5 – National Rifle Association Getting Furious Fast over Fast and Furious

Photo Reposted from LawEnforcementToday.com

Perhaps the most lawless act of the Obama Presidency has been its role in Operation Fast and Furious. The National Rifle Association (NRA) has been out front in keeping this story in the public’s eye. While in Washington, DC, last month, I spoke with NRA Spokesperson Jacqueline Otto about Fast and Furious. She told me the NRA got “furious fast over Fast and Furious“.

Operation Fast and Furious first came to public attention shortly after the murder of US Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry was murdered during a firefight with Mexican gangsters in December of 2010. In the video below, I talk with Otto about the anti-gun agenda of the Obama Administration and how they created Fast and Furious to create a crisis in order to further their gun-control plans.

Sharyl Attkisson, CBS News

Otto acknowledged TexasGOPVote’s role in reporting this scandal early on and keeping the story alive until picked up nationally by CBS reporter Sharyl Attkisson. Senator Charles Grassley and HouseOversight Committee Chairman Daryl Issa led the way for Congressional investigations leading to Contempt of Congress charges being levied against Eric Holder for his refusal to provide subpoenaed documents Congress required to carry out its Constitutionally mandated role of oversight.

On the political agenda of the Obama Administration, Otto explained, “Almost from the beginning there was a chorus of Administration officials using the term ‘90% of the firearms that were used in Mexican violence”. 90% of firearms they said were coming from America.

Otto continued, “What they didn’t tell us was that they were the ones sending them there – through Operation Fast and Furious. And, when that story came to light through the murder of Brian Terry and through the hundreds of Mexican citizens who have been murdered through this violence.

The proof of the gun control agenda soon followed. Otto explained, “They used the 90% figure to justify their new regulatory schemes, their new registration requirements and forcing these federally licensed firearms dealers that are in the border states to jump through more hoops, and do more paperwork and follow more requirements when they weren’t the ones at fault.

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Many of the firearms dealers in Arizona and Texas asked to not participate in this program – fearing violence and death would result from this. They were coerced by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE, or ATF) to continue their participations. This was revealed in one of Senator Grassley’s earliest reports.

In my Feb, 2010 article titled, Agent Brian Terry Murder – DOJ Adds to the Cover-up, I wrote, “The licensed gun dealer who sold the weapons allegedly recovered at the scene of Agent Terry’s murder met with the ATF and the Assistant US Attorney as early as December 2009 to discuss his role as a licensed dealer during this investigation. Avila was allowed to continue his purchases, including two .50 caliber rifles as late as June 2010.

The investigation continues despite an internal DOJ Inspector General report which whitewashed Attorney General Eric Holder’s involvement in Fast and Furious. Ask yourself this, if Holder and Obama are not directly involved, how and why did Obama give Holder Executive Privilege on this scandal?

Will Obama’s Hypocrisy Towards Hispanics Leave Him with Yet More Egg on His Face?

Obama left with egg on his face

President Barrack Obama has a long history of hypocrisy when it comes to Hispanics.  He has made many promises to Hispanics and delivered on none of them.  He continues to dangle the carrot of promises, but so far the promises and left an empty plate of unfulfilled dreams.  But not to worry Hispanics…  According to Obama, he has five more years to get something done for you!  Don’t you feel better now?

In 2007, then Senator Obama said he supported the McCain-Kennedy Immigration Reform Bill which was also supported by then President George W. Bush.  However, the bill failed.  It failed, in some part, do to Obama’s votes for many of the amendments which made the bill unpopular and destined it to failure.  In 2008, Presidential Candidate Obama promised to deliver a pathway to citizenship his first year in office.  This, along with many other of his promises piled up on the list of unfulfilled campaign promises.

When President Obama took office in January of 2009 he was in a position to accomplish virtually anything he wanted.  He had a Democrat controlled House of Representatives ruled by the iron fist of Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  He had a supermajority Senate that was tightly controlled by Majority Leader Harry Reid.  They could pass anything they wanted for nearly two years without a single Republican vote. Despite this position of power, President Obama did not submit one single piece of immigration reform legislation. Not one…

But then, in the waning moments of the Congress in 2010, low and behold a bill was brought forward to provide the children of illegal immigrants a “Dream Act”.  However, this bill was doomed to failure from the beginning because of the Democrats’ anchoring the bill down with abortion on demand amendments and the “Don’t ask, Don’t tell” provisions that ensured that no Republican would vote for the bill.  It was designed by Sen. Reid to fail from the beginning as I wrote in a previous article.

Hispanics left holding the bag as Democrats fail on promises

So, during this period where they could pass anything they wanted (as demonstrated by the cramming down our throats of the ObamaCare legislation) Obama and the Democrats did nothing for Hispanics on immigration reform.  Okay, that is not entirely accurate, they did set a record for splitting up Hispanic families by deporting more illegal immigrants than any president in recent history.  And, according to immigration attorney and fellow TexasGOPVote blogger Linda Vega, the Obama administration deported more US Citizens who were of Hispanic descent than any other president.  Don’t you feel better about Obama now?

How long will Hispanics allow Obama and the Democrats to play them? Will it take them as long to learn as it has other minorities who have been promised much by Democrats over the past fifty years but who are generally worse off today than before?  I certainly hope not.

The Democrat Carrot of Immigration Reform

“I’ve got another five years coming up,” Obama said to a Hispanic radio station yesterday.  Really?  Does he believe Hispanics are too stupid to see what he has promised and failed to deliver in his first two years? Does he really think they won’t realize he could have done whatever he wanted his first year, but chose to ignore their issue?  Does he think Hispanics will ignore the slap in the face to the Catholic church he delivered this month?

What Obama has done in his first term should prove to Hispanics that he and the Democrats do not represent their conservative values. They do not respect the Hispanic people and only seek to keep these issues alive in order to drive a wedge between Hispanics and their true conservative values.  Obama believes his hypocrisy will go un-noticed as he continues to dangle the carrot of promises he has proven he has not intention to deliver.  Obama and the Democrats have lied to Hispanics and will continue to do so as long as they are allowed to get away with unfulfilled dreams.

To quote Congressman Ted Poe,  “… and that’s just the way it is!”

The Texas Border is a War Zone – So Says Texas Ag Commissioner and Two Army Generals

The Texas Border is a war zone. Despite sarcastic jokes and comments from the Department of Homeland Security and President Obama, thousands of people are being killed. Kidnapping, rape and assaults are commonplace throughout the region. While the violence is mostly contained south of the border, the war zone is impacting the lives of residents and ranchers who live and work in South Texas as well as other residents of Texas and the United States. This week, Texas Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples unveiled a 182 page report titled, TEXAS BORDER SECURITY: A Strategic Military Assessment.

Commissioner Todd Staples

Commissioner Staples commissioned the report from military experts, Retired Army General Barry McCaffrey and Retired Army Major General Robert Scales, PhD.  Gen. McCaffrey serves as a national security and terrorism analyst for NBC News and was the former Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. Prior to that he was the Commander-in-Chief of US Armed Forces Southern Command.  Maj. Gen. Scales earned the Silver Star during the infamous Vietnam War battle “Hamburger Hill”.  He served in serveral command and staff positions and ended his military career as Commandant of the US Army War College.

The following video introduces the report. This is perhaps the most detailed assessment of the activities of the NARCO Terrorist Drug Cartels ever released to the public. The intent is not to alarm, but rather to raise the awareness of the public to a problem that is vastly under-reported by the main stream media and the Obama Administration.

 

Following is the Executive Summary of the report.  In the following weeks, TexasGOPVote will bring more detailed reports on this topic including key interviews with Texas officials who are directly involved in protecting the citizens of Texas.


TEXAS BORDER SECURITY: A Strategic Military Assessment


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

During the past two years the state of Texas has become increasingly threatened by the spread of Mexican cartel organized crime. The threat reflects a change in the strategic intent of the cartels to move their operations into the United States. In effect, the cartels seek to create a “sanitary zone” inside the Texas border — one county deep — that will provide sanctuary from Mexican law enforcement and, at the same time, enable the cartels to transform Texas’ border counties into narcotics transshipment points for continued transport and distribution into the continental United States. To achieve their objectives the cartels are relying increasingly on organized gangs to provide expendable and unaccountable manpower to do their dirty work. These gangs are recruited on the streets of Texas cities and inside Texas prisons by top-tier gangs who work in conjunction with the cartels.

Strategic, Operational and Tactical Levels of Conflict

The authors of this report, both retired senior military executives bring more than 80 years of military and governmental service to their perspective on Texas border security viewed in terms of the classic levels of conflict:strategic, operational and tactical.

Strategic

America’s fight against narco-terrorism, when viewed at the strategic level, takes on the classic trappings of a real war. Crime, gangs and terrorism have converged in such a way that they form a collective threat to the national security of the United States. America is being assaulted not just from across our southern border but from across the hemisphere and beyond. All of Central and South America have become an interconnected source of violence and terrorism. Drug cartels exploit porous borders using all the traditional elements of military force, including command and control, logistics, intelligence, information operations and the application of increasingly deadly firepower. The intention is to increasingly bring governments at all levels throughout the Americas under the influence of international cartels.

Operational

In the United States the operational level of the campaign against cartel terrorism is manifested at the state. Texas has become critical terrain and operational ground zero in the cartel’s effort to expand into the United States. Texas has an expansive border with drug cartels controlling multiple shipping lanes into the state. Texas’ location as the geographic center of the U.S. allows for easier distribution of drugs and people. In effect, the fight for control of the border counties along the Rio Grande has become the operational center of gravity for the cartels and federal, state and local forces that oppose them.

Tactical

At the tactical level of war the cartels seek to gain advantage by exploiting the creases between U.S. federal and state border agencies, and the separation that exists between Mexican and American crime-fighting agencies. Border law enforcement and political officials are the tactical focal point. Sadly, the tactical level is poorly resourced and the most vulnerable to corruption by cartels. To win the tactical fight the counties must have augmentation, oversight and close support from operational and strategic forces. History has shown that a common border offers an enemy sanctuary zone and the opportunity to expand his battlespace in depth and complexity. Our border with Mexico is no exception. Criminality spawned in Mexico is spilling over into the United States. Texas is the tactical close combat zone and frontline in this conflict. Texans have been assaulted by cross-border gangs and narco-terrorist activities. In response, Texas has been the most aggressive and creative in confronting the threat of what has come to be a narco-terrorist military-style campaign being waged against them.

Texas as a Narco-Sanctuary

A successful sanctuary permits insurgents to move freely and operate on whichever side offers greater security. In a curious twist of irony, the more successful the Mexican military becomes in confronting the cartels, the greater likelihood that cartels will take the active fight into Texas as they compete against each other in the battle to control distribution territories and corridors Federal authorities are reluctant to admit to the increasing cross-border campaign by narcoterrorists. Until lately, denial has been facilitated by a dearth of evidence that an organized and substantial campaign exists inside Texas. Evidence collected for this report, principally from Texas border counties, reveals a palpable sense of frustration concerning the effectiveness of U.S. federal border operations.

Accounts of this violence, both data driven and anecdotal, compiled by federal agencies, Congressional testimony and the Texas Department of Agriculture underscores the daily activity and constant threat of a larger presence of narco-terrorists than previously thought. The Federal Department of Homeland Security (DHS) does not attribute many narco-crimes to the cartels. Many cross-border crimes are routinely not reported by border farmers and ranchers due to fear of retribution from cartels.

The cartel’s foot soldiers who fight the tactical battle in Texas are “transnational gang” members many of whom are drawn from prison gangs such as the Mexican Mafia, Texas Syndicate, Tango Blast, Barrio Azteca and others that formed in U.S. prisons for selfpreservation and protection from other gangs. These transnational gangs not only have continued to expand in Texas and the nation but constitute a very tightly knit network of cooperation and connectivity that has been growing between prison gangs and Mexican cartels.

Impact on Texans

Fear and anxiety levels among Texas farmers and ranchers have grown enormously during the past two years. Farmers, ranchers and other citizens in border communities are caught in the crossfire of escalating cross-border violence resulting in large part from conflicts between cartels, paramilitary enforcement groups and transnational gangs struggling for control of key drug and illegal alien smuggling routes into the U.S. from El Paso to Brownsville. Some Texas farmers and ranchers have even abandoned their livelihoods to move their families to safer ground.

Living and conducting business in a Texas border county is tantamount to living in a war zone in which civil authorities, law enforcement agencies as well as citizens are under attack around the clock. The Rio Grande River offers little solace to the echoes of gunshots and explosions. News of shootings, murders, kidnappings, beheadings, mass graves and other acts of violence coming across the border go far beyond any definition of “spillover violence.”

Texas Joins the War

Because Texas is the frontline in this conflict and because its citizens and institutions are most affected, the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) has developed a comprehensive military-like operational campaign against narco-terrorists. This effort is still growing and changing in response to an adaptive and ruthless enemy that still harbors an intense desire to take its campaign into the United States. Five years of effort to curtail narco-terrorist intrusion has given the Texas DPS and its state and local partners enormous and hard-won experience in the art and science of fighting the southwest border war.

Beginning in 2006, Texas began a series of high-intensity, sequential, short-duration operations that resulted in crime reductions ranging from 25 percent to as high as 75 percent as smuggling operations decreased. Later, the state expanded and lengthened these operations by increasing the patrol presence along the Texas-Mexico border. Governor Perry was able to achieve this expansion of effort by leveraging various discretionary grants to increase local and state patrol capacity along the border through overtime payments and the purchase of communications and surveillance equipment as well as new vehicles and weapons. The governor also committed Texas military forces to support these operations.

To gain support from the citizenry, in 2007 the Texas Legislature created the Border Security Council (BSC) charged with advising the governor regarding the allocation of discretionary state homeland security funds. The BSC held a series of public hearings and received testimony from business owners, law enforcement officers, local elected officials and private citizens and then produced a comprehensive report and recommendations on border security issues for the governor and Texas Legislature.

Organization for Combat

BSOC-UCs/JOICs

The state of Texas organized for combat in a manner familiar to the military by creating six Unified Commands (UCs) each staffed with a Joint Operations and Intelligence Center (JOICs) located principally within Texas cities most threatened by cartel violence. This Texas effort, led by the Texas Rangers, is dependent on a cooperative relationship based not on command authority, but on a shared relationship, trust and commitment to work together.

This cooperative group of players is represented by federal, state, local and military components. The heart and operational engine of the Texas border security effort is located in Austin within the Border Security Operations Center (BSOC). All unified command and joint players intersect in a single facility administered by the Texas Ranger Division of the DPS. The BSOC collects and shares information from all state, local and federal agencies.

Six years of experience has produced a collaborative interagency network that has grown by establishing trust and confidence among network participants from strategic through tactical. The comity engendered through successful operation allows the BSOC team to chip away at bureaucratic cultures and mindsets. Such experience serves to generate interpersonal incentives and rewards selflessness and a commitment to collaborative behavior.

Years of experimentation and field operations have yielded a wealth of lessons learned as well as new materiel, tactics and doctrine unique to Texas but capable of being shared by other state and federal border security agencies. The BSOC operates using a statewide mapping system that graphically displays and shares with unified commands and federal agencies a crime map that includes all drug, cash and weapons seizures. It fuses information from other state and federal agencies. Texas has developed cheap and effective locally procured wildlife cameras linked to the Internet that are capable of passing images in real time to state authorities.

Texas Rangers Lead the Fight

The first principle of Texas border security operations is to empower local law enforcement. Soldiers often say that bad strategies cannot be salvaged by good tactics— but bad tactics can defeat a good strategy. This saying simply reinforces the truism that no national strategy that seeks to defeat narco-terrorism can be adequately confronted unless tactical units, such as local police and federal border security stations, are properly staffed, resourced, competent and well-led.

The Texas Rangers lead a cooperative program that brings together a ground, air and marine assault capability. Ranger Reconnaissance Teams are the tactical combat elements in the war against narco-terrorists. Each participating federal, state and local agency voluntarily adds its unique capabilities to the teams. The Texas Highway Patrol acts as an outer perimeter for the Rangers by funneling traffic toward Ranger border positions. Tactical contact teams, deploying along the Rio Grande in small, concealed positions, are able to respond immediately to intelligence from Autonomous Surveillance Platform (ASP) units, DPS and National Guard surveillance helicopters, as well as calls to UCs from local police or citizens. DPS Dive Teams conduct SONAR scans of the Rio Grande and assist in recovery of vehicles and contraband in splashdown areas.

Resources remain the greatest impediment to the expansion and continued success of the Rangers’ border war against the cartels. Budget cuts for DHS, its Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the United States Coast Guard USCG) have severely constrained the ability of Texas to rely on its federal partners and their resources to expand border operations.

A Successful System Under Threat

Years of collective effort by Texas law enforcement have yielded a remarkably flexible and efficient system of border protection that involves all levels of command from federal to local. This system is under threat not only by an increasingly ruthless and adaptive enemy but also by an increasingly diminished budget.

Without question, the future success of this effort will depend on the ability of the state of Texas, local and federal agencies to work together to expand their war against intrusion by cartels. The bottom line, however, is that while today Texas is the frontline in this escalating war, the potential consequences of success or failure will affect our entire nation. Thus, it is up to the nation to support Texas in its efforts to defeat this transnational criminal enterprise.

Recommendations

Communications and the Network:

A truly seamless joint effort between federal, state and local law enforcement cannot occur unless all of the players are connected by an integrated broadband system. Such a system must network all land, air and maritime communications systems. It also must be robust enough to connect the smallest border town police departments (with adequate cyber-security controls) to the most sophisticated national domestic intelligence networks. Only a consortium of federal and state and local resources can make such an expansive effort affordable and successful.

Operations:

The success of border operations by the Texas Rangers should serve as a template for the future. Federal border security agencies should continue to support and enhance the current joint operational framework established by the state of Texas and tactically implemented by the Texas Rangers. Reform at that operational level is dependent on bringing more “boots on the ground” to the fight for border security to include a greater participation by the National Guard under state control. All agencies involved should develop a framework and establish an alliance for integrated cross border planning, intelligence sharing, communications and synchronized operations. Such an effort must include all legal, procedural and policy changes necessary to break down bureaucratic, cultural and mind-set barriers that currently exist between front line local, state and federal participants.

Intelligence:

Reform of the border security intelligence system must begin with more sophisticated cross-border technical and human intelligence collection about the enemy coupled with the ability to offer a clearer digital picture of the battlefield to border tactical forces. Key to this effort must be a quantum improvement in the ability of the federal intelligence agencies to gather, analyze and disseminate actionable intelligence and information in real time with state and local law enforcement. Federal support is also needed to accelerate enhancement of the Department of Public Safety’s TxMAP system for Intelligence mapping and data base support.

Technology:

The state of Texas should develop a plan for Federal funding and participation in a “Joint Technology Development Center.” The creation of a joint Federal and state “skunk works” effort would combine federal financial and scientific research assets with the proven success of Texas’ efforts to apply off the shelf technologies to winning the battle for border security. Such an effort would focus on technologies to detect, track, assess, classify, interdict and prosecute criminals along the Southwest border region. Technological areas with the most promise include meshing networks, low cost un-manned ground sensors, ground surveillance radars, remote cameras, aerial platforms, thermal and night vision capabilities, command and control facilities, state of the art weapons and sighting systems as well as identification systems connected to dynamic and inclusive data bases.

Learning:

No amount of well-intended effort will completely eliminate the natural operational friction that exists between disparate federal, state and local agencies confronting these lethal and well-resourced Mexican criminal cartels. Decades of experience in fighting our nation’s foreign wars have shown time and again that reducing operational friction can best be achieved by a system that enhances shared awareness and mutual understanding. To this end, Texas should establish an effort that teaches all participants “how Texas border operations work.” The Texas effort would be based on proven joint military programs. The Texas and federal partners must bring together all participants into a single in-resident and virtual classroom to learn the detailed procedures, statutes, organizations, doctrine, tactical methods and rules of engagement. Faculty and funding would be shared by experienced operators from all levels of law enforcement, federal to local.

END OF SUMMARY

NOTE: This author will be providing additional information from this report as well as conducting exclusive interviews with some of the key members of the Texas Border Defense team. Please share this information with anyone concerned about the future of our country and the impact of narco-terrorism throughout out country.

Principled Texas Lawmakers Save the Texas Economy Millions – No Harsh Anti-Immigrant Laws in Texas

Several states passed Arizona style anti-immigrant laws this year. Texas did not.  Did we sidestep a landmine of unintended consequences? To point, Alabama and Georgia passed laws cracking down on illegal immigrants and employers.  These laws are palliative at best because they don’t address the root cause of our illegal immigration problem, a wide open and unsecured border.  But the worst side of these laws are the unintended consequences, which are currently negatively impacting these two states.

July 1st, Georgia put into law, one of the toughest laws yet to fight illegal immigration. Despite the fact that a federal judge overturned the portion of the law that would require the police to check the immigration status of unidentified suspects (which could be useful in removing the criminal element of the illegal alien population), the portion of the law making it a felony to use false documentation to apply for a job remained in effect.

On the surface that sounds like a great idea, right.  But let’s look at what has happened since then.

Photo by Vino Wong

Immigrant farm worker picking blackberries in Georgia. Photo by Vino Wong

In South Georgia, there is a bumper crop of Blackberries standing by to be picked. However, despite the high level of unemployment in our country, Americans are not showing up to apply for the jobs to pick these berries.  And, because of the new law in Georgia, the immigrant workers who normally line up for these jobs are staying away.

As a result, $200,000 worth of blackberries will rot in one farmer’s field as they remain unpicked.  Extrapolate that out to hundreds of farmers across the state and you will find increases in the price of blackberries at your grocery store.  Yet another unintended consequence.

Former President George W. Bush

I remember screaming at my television when then President George W. Bush said in a State of the Union Address that illegal aliens were doing the jobs that Americans don’t want to do.  But the more I have learned in my years of studying and working on this issue is, he was right in many cases. There are many jobs in this country that go unfilled if illegal aliens do not take them.  Of course, part of the reason they are illegal is because we cancelled programs that used to allow them to come here legally to do these kinds of jobs. This must be fixed.

7200 Homes and Businesses Destroyed by Tornado - Who will rebuild?

Similarly, the situation in Alabama, where 7200 homes and businesses were leveled by a massive tornado in April.  There is a high demand for construction labor to rebuild these homes.  Yet, according to Bloomberg, much of that labor force is disappearing after Alabama’s enactment of tough anti-immigrant laws.

In June, Alabama Governor Robert Bentley signed the 72 page document that became one of the newest and strongest immigration laws in the country.  The unintended consequence here, Hispanic workers are fleeing Tuscaloosa by the thousands.

Hispanic Constructions Workers Disappearing in Alabama

According to the Bloomberg report, “Hispanics, documented and undocumented, dominate anything to do with masonry, concrete, framing, roofing, and landscaping,” said Bob McNelly, a contractor with Nash-McCraw Properties, during an interview at a coffee shop near a destroyed gas station and bank.

“There are very few subcontractors I work with that don’t have a Hispanic workforce.

The city of 90,000 imposed a moratorium on major reconstruction that ends Aug. 8 to enable it to plan its remaking. The rebuilding, McNelly said, will be harder and more expensive without them: “It’s not the pay rate. It’s the fact that they work harder than anyone. It’s the work ethic.

These kinds of stories are being replicated in every state that has enacted strong anti immigration laws. The unintended consequence is always economic damage to the state.  I know this is not going to be a popular article, but it is something we must think about.

Why should we shoot ourselves in the foot when these laws do not address the root cause of the problem – The federal government’s failure to secure the border and enact responsible immigration reform.

Rep. John Garza

Texas State Rep. John Garza

This year, the Texas House Republican Hispanic Conference introduced a resolution, HCR88, to call on the federal government to do just that. Secure the border and address immigration laws in a responsible fashion that does not allow for amnesty, but recognizes the economic impact of immigrant workers in this country. Wisely, the leadership of the legislature avoided passing harsh anti-immigrant laws that would have caused negative economic impact in Texas.

Our undefined border policy has left a situation of chaos and lawlessness along our southern border. This chaos has caused drug cartels to flourish and has created a new industry of human trafficking and abuse of decent human beings.  A virtual war has broken out south of our border because we will not address the issue responsibly. States are scrambling across the country trying to figure out how to solve a massive problem that affects them but they have no real authority to address.

We must send a message to Washington that we want our border secured and we want an end to the broken system of unenforced ineffective immigration laws which must be addressed to ultimately resolve this problem.